Nordic Systems Engineering Tour


Nordic Systems Engineering tour är en heldag i Systems Engineerings tecken. På programmet står 6 presentationer och naturligtvis gott om tid för diskussion! Dagen arrangeras på Equmeniakyrkan i Linköping, see https://goo.gl/maps/Gr6kDAajYh7KdZry7

För att kunna anmäla dig så måste vara inloggad på www.incose.se. Du kan skapa ett konto utan kostnad under menyn Skapa konto. 

09:00 – 09:15

Welcome by INCOSE Sverige

09:15 – 10:00

Annika Meijer Henriksson

Large Scale Systems Engineering in practice – a chief engineers’ perspective

10:00 – 10:30

 Coffee Break and Networking

10:30 – 11:15

Stephanie Chiesi

Realizing the Desired Outcomes of Digital Engineering Implementation

11:15 – 12:00

Ellen Bergseth, David Williamsson and Rakesh Jayaprakash

Teaching Systems Engineering to a large class of second level students

12:00 – 13:15

Lunch and Networking

13:15 – 13:45

Paul Schreinemakers and Tom Strandberg

Realizing the Systems Engineering Vision 2035; We need your participation!!

13:45 – 14:30

Jasper Bussemaker, Pina Donelli and Luca Boggero

An MBSE Process with Architecture Design Space Exploration and Value-based Decision Making

14:30 – 15:15

Coffee Break and Networking

15:15 – 16:00

Alexander Efremov

Managing changes in a part of one German automotive engineering centre: The fortunate failure

16:00 – 16:15

Famous Last Words

 

An MBSE Process with Architecture Design Space Exploration and Value-based Decision Making

Jasper Bussemaker, Pina Donelli and Luca Boggero

The model-based systems engineering approach developed in the AGILE4.0 project features all conceptual design stages from requirements to design space exploration. This presentation presents some details of the system architecture design space exploration and value-based decision-making steps.

Designing a system architecture is not trivial as it involves taking important decisions early in the design process. This challenge combined with the large combinatorial design spaces present in complex system design problems necessitates a more automated way to explore architecture alternatives. Architecture optimization aims to improve the system architecting process by formulating the architecting process as a numerical optimization problem with formally defined decision variables and quantifiable design objectives.

The presented framework uses the Architecture Design Space Graph (ADSG): a function-based formulation that does not require system engineers to be experts in formulating optimization problems. System architecture alternatives are evaluated by Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) techniques in order to get system-level performance estimates.

After the design space has been explored and a Pareto-front of optimal architectures has been found, the value-based decision-making method can be used to find the design option that best meets stakeholder needs.

Realizing the Desired Outcomes of Digital Engineering Implementation

Stephanie Chiesi

Digital Transformation changes how we perform engineering tasks in the product development lifecycle to reduce the time to market. This concept is at the heart of the US Department of Defense Digital Engineering Strategy as a means of rapid delivery for increased capabilities to the warfighter, though it is a desire in many industries. As we implement Digital Engineering and connect data in our digital ecosystems as part of our engineering practices, this also changes the data available to decision makers. Changing the barriers of data accessibility, timeliness, pedigree, and relevance means that decision makers have a different dataset to inform their choices than previously encountered. This increase in data may not lead to improved capabilities or shorter delivery times depending on the training and background of those using the new data and making the decisions. This presentation will review how engineering decision making may be impacted as Digital Engineering is implemented in the product lifecycle and how further adaptations may be needed to realize the desired benefits of reduced cycle time and improved capabilities. This presentation will also introduce a surrogate model approach to advancing fundamental research in decision making in a digital engineering environment to realize the desired outcome of reduced product lifecycle time.

Teaching Systems Engineering to a large class of second level students

Ellen Bergseth, David Williamsson and Rakesh Jayaprakash

The Systems Engineering course, in Swedish Systemkonstruktion, at the Department of Engineering Design at KTH has yearly about 60 students from three different master programs. The students have a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, Design and Product Realisation, or equivalent. About 25 percent of the students are international students. The primary purpose of the course is to introduce technical complexity and uncertainty, balancing desired and undesired effects when developing a system or product. The students must apply theoretical knowledge in a more practical and bigger picture context. Project work constitutes the main part of the course and is based on an analysis and redesign of an existing technical system. The whole class is one project group with one common goal divided into several subgroups of 4-6 students. That makes it possible to solve problems with a higher degree of complexity. One member of each development group will also be a member of a system integration group responsible for architecture definition, systems model updating, interface flaw detections, system performance verification etc. A stage-gate process and the V-model support the project development progress. Students should put in 240 hours in total, with 60 hours scheduled.

The projects have, up till now, been linked to the energy or the ground transport sector, for example, redesigning a wave energy harvester system or creating a conceptual design of an autonomous heavy-duty truck. The 2023s task was to redesign an old train into a new conceptual metro train running on electricity in the Stockholm metro system. Work is mixed with lectures and seminars involving researchers and industry representatives to support the project's progress. The industry involvement is appreciated, and the quality of the course is highly dependent on this. Having the course as one large project brings the main challenge of handling the integration difficulties. Since there is no single authority in the class, the system integration group has more than ten members; this is a shortcoming. Another challenge is pushing the students to work with limited information and better communicate the main requirements early without the need for detailed subtask knowledge. The project work requires high demands on planning and communication within the group and makes all subgroup members use their unique skills and be brave enough to act in the group. This paper discusses mitigating these challenges, the actions taken to improve the course, and the newly introduced topic threats and hazard evaluation.

Realizing the Systems Engineering Vision 2035; We need your participation!!

Paul Schreinemakers and Tom Strandberg

In early 2022 INCOSE published the Systems Engineering Vision 2035. This document was created is close collaboration with representatives from other organizations.  The Vision drafts a picture of the societal changing context for our discipline, the current state, the future state of Systems Engineering and a roadmap for realizing the Vision.  To guide the realization of the Vision, INCOSE has setup the initiative called FuSE (Future of Systems Engineering).

This presentation provides an overview of the SE Vision 2035, introduces the FuSE initiative including it’s active workstreams and reports on the status of it’s on-going activities. The way we need to adapt our discipline to remain relevant in the future is not something that is directed by the Vision or FuSE, but will need all active Systems Engineer’s contribution. The attendees will be challenged to participate in realizing the vision.

Large Scale Systems Engineering in practice – a chief engineers’ perspective

Annika Meijer Henriksson

There is chasm between the tidy published descriptions of Systems Engineering and the actual reality of realizing a complex heterogeneous system, e.g., a fighter aircraft. Don’t get me wrong, there is high value in the published material, but when applied adaptations must be made to manage the realities of systems development. This talk will start out from Systems Engineering theory and discuss adaptations made in recent development programs, e.g., Gripen E and T-7.

Managing changes in a part of one German automotive engineering centre: The fortunate failure

Alexander Efremov

In the realm of modern enterprises, comprehensive and manageable changes are often necessary. Incremental improvements facilitated by continuous improvement processes, which predominantly enable bottom-up changes, are no longer sufficient. This is due to the significant and rapid shifts in the business environment, including emerging competition from new market players unburdened by legacy approaches, evolving customer needs, and the emergence of new materials and products.

Even established automotive industry giants face the challenge of competition from agile companies like Tesla, the demand for sustainability, and the advent of software-intensive products and electric vehicles.

In response to these new realities, enterprises embark on transformation or change initiatives, involving both internal and external personnel in their management and execution.

This report focuses on a specific case within such an initiative: a change management project in the chassis department of a prominent German automotive OEM, overseen by the author.

The author provides a multi-dimensional perspective on the project, covering five distinct viewpoints:

Scope definition (accompanied by a crash course in systems thinking for the project team)

Culture and strategy (addressing obstacles and fostering collaboration within the team)

Minimal viable product (highlighting the importance of gaining management support)

Interaction with the environment (learning from others' mistakes and disregarding less useful inputs)

Implementing changes (describing processes and methods and their practical application in real projects)

The intended audience will delve into the project from each viewpoint, exploring three levels of depth: beginning with a relatable example, progressing to the tools and concepts employed, and concluding with relevant literature and references for further research.

The author hopes that readers will recognize analogous situations in their own contexts, apply basic tools and concepts, and know where to seek further guidance when faced with more complex challenges.

 

Detaljer

När
  • 20 September
Var  Equmeniakyrkan Linköping
Aktivitet startar  ons 20 sep 2023 (v. 38)
Aktivitet slutar  ons 20 sep 2023 (v. 38)
Kostnad
  • 0,00 kr
  • 850,00 kr för MOA Member
  • 600,00 kr för MOA Senior Member
  • 1 700,00 kr för Associate Member
  • 200,00 kr för MOA Student Member
Status  Stängd
Bokning
  • Stängd

Deltagare/Medlem

1 Linda Cederberg
2 Jonas Hallqvist
3 Zeinab Raoofi
4 Claudia Andruetto
5 Susanne Falk
6 Daniel Ersson
7 Daniel Widell
8 Marianne Johansson
9 Johan Bredin
10 Ulf Gerhardsson
11 Ekhiotz Jon Vergara
12 Åsa Jonsson
13 Tom Strandberg
14 Joel Martinsson
15 Bhavana Vaddadi
16 Niklas von Schéele
17 Niklas Umland
18 Nicholaus Lundbohm
19 Markus Nordstrand
20 Andreas Schön
21 Jonas Lindh
22 Tobias Sundin
23 Christer Asplund
24 Sven Öberg
25 Jan Johansson
26 Julian Grujicic
27 Ulf Skytte af Sätra
 Den här gruppen har även 8 deltagare som valt att vara anonyma.